Sexual Well-Being

The three things a guy should want to change about his girl is her last name, address, and her viewpoint on men.

Kid Cudi

Hooking up and having intimate relationships are common in college. Let’s be honest, being sexually active has its perks.

Unfortunately, there are downsides.

Without consent from both individuals, hooking up can lead to some serious problems. Many of the downsides, however, can be avoided by practicing safe, consensual sexual activity and by encouraging the #HoosierNation to do the same.

  • What We Know

    • 90% have had sexual partners and 84% have had vaginal intercourse
    • Among students who are engaging in sex, 46% of students stated that their last sexual partner was someone they were committed to and 46% stated that it was a casual encounter.
    • 52% used a condom during their most recent sexual encounter
    • 26% have been tested for an STI and 20% have been tested for HIV
  • What Can We Do?

    • Talk about sex! Research tells us that if you talk with your partner openly about sex, you’re more likely to use contraception and avoid an STI or unplanned pregnancy.
    • Keep talking. Tell your partner what you feel comfortable doing – what you like and what you don’t. You’ll both have a better time, and avoid crossing boundaries.
    • Be assertive. When you are talking with your partner about using a condom, be assertive. Your partner will be more likely to use a condom. Be assertive and don’t be afraid to insist that your partner or your friends use condoms.
    • Get consent. Before engaging in sexual activity, both individuals should explicitly state they are willing. Remember – good sex is consensual sex.
    • Get tested. There are over 19 million new cases of STIs every year in the United States - Nearly half of these new cases occur among people ages 15-24 years. So encourage your friends to get tested for STI’s at the IU Health Center. Also, The GLBT Support Services Offices offers free HIV testing every Thursday.